Ocean Salinity Change

This page has been created for the media in support of "Ocean Salinities Reveal Strong Global Water Cycle Intensification during 1950-2000" by Paul J. Durack, Susan E. Wijffels and Richard J. Matear - published in Science Magazine 27th April 2012. DOI: 10.1126/science.1212222

ALL MATERIAL IS EMBARGOED WITH SCIENCE AND IS NOT FOR RELEASE UNTIL 2PM U.S. EASTERN TIME, THURSDAY 26th APRIL 2012.

To support this publication a media release and some additional FAQs are being provided for media use.

The following images are available to support the Durack et al. (2012) publication.

Paul Durack

Figure S1. A schematic representation of the global water cycle, with the key role of the ocean and surface rainfall and evaporation fluxes expressed (Paul Durack) - Clicking HERE will download a high-resolution *.tif file suitable for print.

Paul Durack

Figure 1G. Surface salinity changes for 1950 to 2000. Red indicates regions becoming saltier, and blue regions becoming fresher (Paul Durack) - Clicking HERE will download an archive containing a high-resolution *.tif and *.eps file suitable for print.

CSIRO: Steve Rintoul

Photo 1. Monitoring of the Southern Ocean using arrays of anchored and drifting instruments reveals freshening of deep waters around Antarctica. Some of the extra melting of ice around the edge of Antarctica is flowing into the sea and getting carried down to the deep ocean by ocean currents. (CSIRO: Steve Rintoul) - Clicking HERE will download a high-resolution *.tif file suitable for print.

CSIRO

Photo 2. Lined with bottles triggered at different levels of the ocean, this conductivity, temperature and depth profiler bearing a suite of sampling bottles is a mainstay of oceanography. It can be deployed to depths of 6,000 metres to study changes in ocean temperature and salinity. (CSIRO: Ann Thresher) - Clicking HERE will download a high-resolution *.tif file suitable for print.

CSIRO

Photo 3. Lined with bottles triggered at different levels of the ocean, this conductivity, temperature and depth profiler bearing a suite of sampling bottles is a mainstay of oceanography. It can be deployed to depths of 6,000 metres to study changes in ocean temperature and salinity. (CSIRO) - Clicking HERE will download a high-resolution *.tif file suitable for print.

CSIRO

Photo 4. Monitoring of the Southern Ocean using arrays of anchored and drifting instruments reveals freshening of deep waters around Antarctica. Some of the extra melting of ice around the edge of Antarctica is flowing into the sea and getting carried down to the deep ocean by ocean currents. (CSIRO: Steve Rintoul) - Clicking HERE will download a high-resolution *.tif file suitable for print.

CSIRO: Alicia Navidad

Photo 5. Akin to having a fleet of miniature research vessels, the global flotilla of more than 3,000 robotic profiling floats provides crucial information on upper layers of the world's ocean currents. (CSIRO: Alicia Navidad) - Clicking HERE will download a high-resolution *.tif file suitable for print.

CSIRO

Video 1. Selected footage of oceanographic videos for use in broadcast (CSIRO) - Clicking HERE (783Mb) will download a high-definition *.mp4 file suitable for broadcast, a lower resolution file is available from HERE (131Mb).